Graphics settings and their impact on performance, using Dying Light as an example.

I found the results of the last test interesting and decided to repeat it. There wasn't much space left on the SSD disk, only enough for Dying Light. When it came out I was very disappointed for the unfairly forgotten Dead Island and not released second part. But in the end, I recognized that Dying Light was a good game, and I spent a fair amount of time playing it. Its optimization leaves a lot to be desired, as no matter how high the FPS is, the freezes still force me to lower the settings. And transferring the game to a solid state drive doesn't help it, the freezes still remain. But the "Game Prelauncher" utility seems to have smoothed out this roughness. All that remains is to reduce the boot time, but there's hardly anything you can do about it anymore if even with an SSD it boots in 33 seconds, although maybe it's me being cheeky. If you're using Windows 10, turn on game mode, my average FPS went up 7%.

Testing was conducted during the task "air cargo", when the time of day has stopped, and the place was not chosen by chance, from one of the roofs near the tower you can see the city from the closest place to the farthest. The horizontal viewing angle is the standard 90 degrees.
Computer Configuration:
Windows 7 Ultimate x64operating system
; MSI B150M PRO-DHmotherboard;
Intel i5-6600 Skylakeprocessor;
Kingston DDR4 2133MHz 8GBRAM;
ASUS GeForce GTX 950 STRIX OCgraphics card;
Kingston SKC400S37/128G + Western Digital Caviar Blue WD10EZEXdisk subsystem.

At all minimum graphics settings, FullHD-resolution, full-screen mode, and prelauncher, turning off everything in sight, the result was as follows:
1,349 MBof video memory (and 1,829 MB through times);
4,516 MB

of

RAM

(

and the same times 4251 MB);
CPU loaded at 79%;
frame rate at rest 101 frames, while running on the map from 84 to 120,
rendering time frame was 9.6 ms.

With all the settings as follows:
Video memory occupied 1970 MB (+621 MB);
RAM usage 5089 MB (573 MB);
Processor loaded at 43% (he raised a little bit the frequency);
frame rate at rest 41 frames, and while running on the map from 24 to 52 (-60 frames);
rendering




time




frame was 24.4 ms (+14.8




ms).






Result at maximum texture quality:
Video memory occupied 1951 MB (+602 MB);
RAM occupied 4556 MB (+40 MB);
CPU loaded at 79%;
Frame rate



at



rest 100 frames (-1 frame);
Framerendering time was 9.8 ms (+0.2




ms).






The difference is not great, we can safely lower it.

Result at maximum shadow map resolution:
1426 MBof video memory (+77 MB);
4511 MB

of

RAM (-5 MB);
Processor loaded at 79%;
Frame rate



at



rest: 91 frames (-10 frames);
Framerendering time: 10.9 ms (+1.3




ms).






Result at maximum resolution of shadow map and enabled PCSS:
1880 MBof video memory used (+531 MB);
4362 MB

of

RAM (-154 MB);
Processor loaded at 51%;
67 frames idlerate (-34 frames);
15 ms (+5.4 ms)render



















































































ing
























































































time.





Very questionable result, it's worth disabling.

Result at maximum folio quality:
Video memory occupied 1350 MB (+1 MB);
RAM occupied 4500 MB (-16 MB);
CPU loaded at 78%;
Frame rate



at



rest 98 frames (-3 frames);
Framerendering time was 10.4 ms (+0.8




ms).






In general, I do not see the difference, turn it off.

The result with all minimum settings and maximum viewing range:
Video memory occupied 1353 MB (+4 MB);
RAM occupied 4537 MB (+21 MB);
CPU loaded at 74%;
Frame rate at rest 83 frames (-18 frames); Frame
render





















































































































ing


























































































































time




was 11.7 ms (+2.1




ms).






Note the bars on the windows. You can clearly see how detailed objects turn into mush with the distance. Even a 4x DSR with 100% smoothness and 8x antialiasing is unable to handle it. Only 4k-monitor will probably help here, meanwhile I would lower view distance and turn on anti-aliasing.

Results with Ambient Occlusion enabled:
Video memory usage of 1388 MB (+39 MB);
RAM usage of 4540 MB (+24 MB);
CPU usage of 63%;
Frame rate



at



rest of 83 frames (-18 frames);
Framerendering time of 12 ms (2.4




ms).






Result with Ambient Occlusion and HBAO+ enabled:
1433 MBof video memory (+84 MB);
4539 MB

of

RAM (+23 MB);
CPU loaded 58%;
Frame rate



at



rest 76 frames (-25 frames);
Framerendering time was 13.1 ms (+3.5




ms).





The difference is not visible at all. We leave Ambient Occlision and disable HBAO+.

Result with depth of field enabled:
1432 MBof video memory occupied (+83 MB);
4540 MB

of

RAM (+24 MB);
Processor loaded at 79%;
Frame rate at rest 99 frames (-2 frames);
Framerendering time was 9.6 ms (+0




ms).






I don't see any difference, turn it off.

Result with antialiasing turned on:
1450 MBof video memory occupied (+101 MB);
4547 MB ofRAM (+31 MB);
CPU loaded at 69%;
Frame rate



at



rest: 90 frames (-11 frames); Frame
render























































































































































































ing




























































































































































































time:




11.1 ms (1.5




ms).






The picture became smoother, but the detail in the distance does not save it.

The results with included graininess:
1450 MBof video memory occupied (+1 MB);
4542 MB

of

RAM (+26 MB);
Processor loaded at 79%;
Frame rate at rest 100 frames (-1 frame);
Framerendering time was 9.6 ms (+0




ms).






Graininess is sometimes not noticeable at all, but sometimes it seems even excessive.

I did not record the result when chromatic aberration was on, but it is similar to that for graininess.

It does not make any sense. Let's turn it off.

Ambient occlusion, HBAO+, rangefinder and PCSS eat upa lot of frames.
A lot of frames are chewed up by antialiasing and shadows.
Textures, depth of field, chromatic aberration, graininess, and foliage eat upa bit of frames. dying light, blogs, games, tests, settings, comparisons, graphics Write a comment Total comments: 6